8 Lies You Tell Yourself That Protect Your Addiction.

Addiction Lies

September 22nd, 2015 | By Lorelie Rozzano | Posted in Addiction, Alcohol Addiction, Blog, Drug Addiction

Lorelie Rozzano is a guest blogger for Addiction Campuses.

8 Lies You Tell Yourself That Protect Your Addiction.

Long before addiction sets its sharp teeth into you, something far more insidious is happening. Although you can’t see or feel it, it’s there, nonetheless. Addiction really isn’t about what you use, or even, how much. Addiction is about avoidance, pain and dishonest thinking. Your thoughts and perceptions are hijacked in a way that justifies your using. You focus on the negative side of life, without giving thought to all that is good. You blame others, while taking no responsibility for your choices or actions. Before long, delusion sets in. Delusion occurs when you believe the lies, you keep telling yourself. Below are eight examples of addictive, dishonest thinking.

 

I Need To use. You might have told yourself this so many times, that you really believe it. The truth is, you don’t need to use, you want to. But you do need to breathe. And continued drug use will stop you from doing that. Being addicted to drugs makes you afraid to quit. Believing you need to use is an example of how honest and dishonest thinking, gets twisted around.

 

Using makes me feel better. Actually using doesn’t make you feel better; it makes you feel worse. It’s destroying your life. It does however, take away your physical withdrawal symptoms for a brief period of time, before you will need to use again.

 

I won’t have any fun if I quit using. Get real. You’re not having fun now. Although you’d like to have fun, what you’re really doing is chasing those early highs. Back when you could use with little consequences. But those days are over and you can’t get them back. Your brain chemistry is changed and your tolerance has increased. You cannot undo that. Now when you use, you don’t even feel high, just sorta normal, and even that, is wearing off. Soon you’ll need to use so much that you’ll administer a deadly dose, only you’ll never know it – but your family will.

 

I’ll die from withdrawal. With the proper medical care not only won’t you die, you’ll be made very comfortable throughout the detox process. As a matter of fact, within a very short time you’ll feel better than you have in years.

 

I’ll never be able to get clean and sober. Yes you can get clean and sober, but not if you keep practising shortcuts and doing it alone. Get professional help and follow ALL the suggestions. “I did everything that was suggested of me and I still relapsed,” said no one, ever!

 

I’ll do it tomorrow. Quit stalling, you might not have tomorrow. Someone is dying from a drug overdose every thirteen minutes. You could be next. Tomorrow is never guaranteed. Each and every time you put off quitting, your chances of doing so, are lessened.

 

I’m not really addicted, I can quit anytime I want. I just don’t want to. Addicted individuals put their drug of choice before the needs of their family. If your family is talking to you about their concerns and you defend your usage and keep at it, this means you’ve put your DOC above your family’s needs. Your most important relationship is with using. Not with your family. You may argue this point but actions, not words, tell the truth.

 

I need to hit rock bottom – There is no rock bottom. There are only new and deadlier deep ends, each and every time. You have a far better chance of succeeding in the earlier stages of your addiction, than you do in the latter. Addiction is a progressive and terminal illness. It can leave the addicted individual cognitively impaired and physically compromised. By the time most addicts are in the terminal stages, apathy has settled in. Apathy is deadly. Apathetic individuals don’t really care if they live or die and are indifferent to the dangers they face.

 

You’ve probably had moments of reality where you see clearly, the devastation your addiction is reaping in your and your families, life. You may have tried controlling your usage, changing the drugs you use, or even stopping, altogether.

 

You might feel that everyone is against you. Or that the only people who really get you, are the addicts you use with. Each time you go against your morals and values, shame builds. When sober and remorseful, you feel badly about the pain and suffering, you’re inflicting upon your family. But you’re not bad. You are however, sick.

 

You do not need to lose everything that’s important to you, to come to your senses. After a using binge, or when facing the consequences of your actions, you will be far more susceptible to accepting help.

 

You might believe that people don’t know you’re addicted, but don’t kid yourself, they do. Asking for help isn’t a sign of weakness, but one of great courage. Your friends and family are willing to help you. They will feel relief that you’ve decided to do something about your problem. But more importantly, you will get the help you so desperately need, and deserve. Why not make the call today? There is no better time, than now.

 

If you or someone you know needs help, please call our confidential support line for assistance. 1 888 614 – 2379.