Addiction Campuses to Participate in Nashville’s Semi-Annual National Drug Take Back for Third Consecutive Year

October 28th, 2017 | By Brian Sullivan

*****FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE*****

 

DATE: October 28, 2017

TIME:

10am-2pm CST

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Addiction Campuses:

Brian Sullivan

Director of Public Relations

[email protected]

Addiction Campuses

205 Reidhurst Ave.

Nashville, TN 37203

P: 901.949.7926

Semi-Annual National Drug Take-Back:

Kristina Clark

Consultant

Grants Management and Sustainability

Count It! Lock It! Drop It!

[email protected]

Coffee County Anti-Drug Coalition

122 McMinnville Hwy

Manchester, TN 37355

P: 931.247.2542

Addiction Campuses to Participate in Nashville’s Semi-Annual National Drug Take Back for Third Consecutive Year

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (October 28, 2017) – Addiction Campuses, nationwide leader in alcoholism, substance use disorder and mental health treatment, announces it will participate in Nashville’s Semi-Annual National Drug Take Back Event this Saturday from 10am-2pm CST at various locations throughout the city.

 

“It doesn’t start with a needle or a trip to the emergency room,” says Addiction Campuses Director of Public Relations Brian Sullivan. “Anyone who has survived an overdose or knows someone who has, they know that statement to be true. Safely disposing of our unwanted or unused medication prevents addiction, suicide and theft. Accessible medication in our home is a loaded weapon, and it absolutely must be used, stored and discarded of responsibly.”

Officers with the Metropolitan Nashville Police Department will be present at all locations during the events, and agents with the local Drug Enforcement Agency will collect the medication and transport it to an incinerator.

 

“Even though addiction has taken three generations of my family, the cycle has ended with me,” says Count It! Lock It! Drop It! Goodwill Ambassador and Miss Tennessee Caty Davis. “As the daughter of an addict who lost his life due to addiction, I am thrilled to raise awareness of this incredible program.”

 

Media Inquiries

For any media inquiries regarding Nashville’s Semi-Annual National Drug Take Back Events, contact Kristina Clark directly at [email protected] or 931.247.2542. For media inquiries regarding Addiction Campuses or any of its affiliates, contact Director of Public Relations Brian Sullivan at [email protected] or 901.949.7926.

Locations

3010 West End Ave.

Nashville, TN 37203

Team Leader: Mike Clark

Volunteers: John Clark, Summer Larson, Logan Haley, Alex Davis

 

2819 Nolensville Pike

Nashville, TN 37211

Team Leader: Elizabeth Egan

Volunteers: Jimmy Egan, Kim Nguyen, Thao Pham, Ashia Hampton

 

2500 Gallatin Ave.

Nashville, TN 37206

Team Leader: Leah Festa

Volunteers: Amanda Vantrease, Kristine Hoang, Suzanne Rutley

 

3130 Clarksville Pike

Nashville, TN 37218

Team Leader: Brian Sullivan

Volunteers: Jasmine Hall, Chasity Tyus, Kylah Casey

 

2611 Franklin Pike

Nashville, TN 37204

Team Leaders: Alyssa Hanus, Christy Manning

Volunteers: Katrina Barnett, Judy Trac, Chelsea Williams

 

7601 Highway 70 S

Bellevue, TN 37221

Team Leader: Kristina Clark

Volunteers: Khadijah Mull, Tracy Trvong, Linh Nguyen, Justice Miller

About Team Leaders

Elizabeth Egan

Elizabeth is a native of Louisiana, has lived in many places, but now calls Tennessee her home. It has always been her passion to make a positive difference in the lives of children. After graduating from Loyola University in New Orleans, she spent time as a nanny, teacher and human resources assistant before starting a family with her husband Jimmy. Elizabeth currently works as a senior associate for KM Clark Consulting Group. She homeschooled her three sons, and continues to educate her youngest. This organization has allowed her to merge her passions for working with children and service to others. Elizabeth thanks one brave selfless man, Phillip Ryan Robertson, for inspiring her family to reach out to the children at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. She thanks his parents for giving them their blessing to honor Phillip’s memory and wish by serving the children through this organization. Elizabeth thanks her son, Jack, for his wish to visit St. Jude for his 16th birthday and deliver the first set of blankets. The experience was life-changing for Elizabeth, her husband, and Jack. She says her son Jack said it best as they were leaving to head home from their tour, “I couldn’t think of a better way to spend my 16th birthday. I have done a lot of other things, but none of them has been as meaningful.”

 


Leah Festa

Leah Festa serves as the Director for the Prevention Alliance of Tennessee. Prior to joining PAT, she worked at the Center for Patient and Professional Advocacy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. She has served on the Tennessee Center for Performance Excellence’s Board of Examiners and currently volunteers as a Court Appointed Special Advocate for CASA Nashville. Leah holds a Masters in Public Administration from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville.


Brian Sullivan

After one year with Addiction Campuses, Brian Sullivan was promoted by Chief Marketing Officer Eric Mitchell from Public Relations Manager to Director of Public Relations. Before hiring with Addiction Campuses, Sullivan served over a decade in the television industry, with over 20 years experience as a print and broadcast journalist. He oversees all media communications, community projects, publicity campaigns and public marketing strategy for Addiction Campuses and all of its affiliates. Sullivan is an Emmy Award Winning producer, writer, lobbyist, activist and marketing strategist. He is active in several campaigns raising awareness in addiction treatment, equality and mental health care. He won the 2016 Nashville Emerging Leader of the Year Award. He is an active member of the Prevention Alliance of Tennessee, the Williamson County Anti-Drug Coalition, the Memphis Area Prevention Alliance, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Facing Addiction, Fed Up!, the Nashville Chamber of Commerce, the Nashville LGBT Chamber of Commerce, the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, the National Association of Black Journalists, the Center for Nonprofit Management, Music City Theatre Company, LGBTQI Nashvillians of Faith, Covenant of the Cross Ministries, the American Civil Liberties Union, The American Civil Liberties Union of Tennessee, the Tennessee Equality Project, the Human Rights Campaign, Human Rights Campaign Nashville, the Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition and the Nashville Filmmakers Guild. Sullivan is a proud donor of the Memphis Hope House, Nashville Cares, Covenant Cupboard Food Pantry and Second Harvest Food Bank.

Kristina Clark

Kristina Clark is the President and Founder of KM Clark Consulting Group, a consulting company dedicated to developing and sustaining non-profits. Kristina Clark served as the Executive Director of the Coffee County Anti-Drug Coalition from 2007-2016 before transitioning to Grant Writer and Sustainability Consultant for the coalition, a position she still holds today. Ms. Clark has dedicated herself to non-profit work since graduating from Middle Tennessee State University in May of 2006 with a Bachelor’s of Science in psychology and minors in mental services and sociology. Before serving as the Coalition Executive Director, Kristina held positions as a domestic violence court advocate and in home counselor for at risk youth. In 2012, Ms. Clark earned her Certified Prevention Specialist II and now trains throughout Tennessee on the prevention of alcohol and drug abuse as well as non-profit management and capacity building. Under her leadership the Coalition has achieved several awards and grants including Drug Free Communities funding (Years 1-10), the National Got Outcomes! Coalition in Focus award 2013, Tennessee Department of Health’s Injury Prevention award 2012 and a 2014 Patriotic Employer Award from the Office of the Secretary of Defense Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve. With community collaboration and staff team work, Ms. Clark has been able to achieve community level change regarding substance abuse behaviors on a county

wide scale including successfully advocating for local and state policy change. As an advocate for diversifying funds for nonprofit sustainability, Ms. Clark lead her community coalition in trademarking and marketing a successful comprehensive prescription drug campaign, Count it! Lock it! Drop it!® which will provide the non-profit foundation money for the future as well as assist counties throughout the country in reducing prescription drug abuse. Kristina Clark is also an executive board member for the Prevention Alliance of Tennessee, a statewide prevention legislation advocacy organization. Kristina Clark was raised throughout the United States as a proud Air Force brat. Ms. Clark has now made Tennessee home base with her husband and best friend Michael Clark, their black lab Sammie “Trainwreck” Clark, and beautiful toddler Michael Joseph.

 

2016 Davidson County Drug Facts (Data from Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services)

  • 227 total overdose deaths
  • 33.2 deaths per 100,000 people
  • 1258 nonfatal outpatient overdoses
  • 764 nonfatal inpatient overdoses
  • 561,738 painkiller prescriptions (821 per 1000 people)
  • 178 opioid overdose deaths (26 per 100,000 people)
  • 70 heroin overdose deaths (10 per 100,000 people)

2015 Davidson County Drug Facts

  • 138 outpatient visits involving all opioid overdose excluding heroin (20 per 100,000 people)
  • 133 inpatient stays involving all opioid overdose excluding heroin (20 per 100,000 people)
  • 34 inpatient stays involving heroin overdose (5 per 100,000 people) and 137 outpatient visits involving heroin overdose (20 per 100,000 people)

Glossary of Terms

Indicators – something that points to an issue or condition. Indicators are best used when comparable over time.

Mortality – death

 

Mortality Indicators

  • All Drug Overdose Deaths – drug overdose deaths caused by acute poisonings. This indicator includes all overdose deaths, regardless of intent (e.g., unintentional, suicide, assault, or undetermined). This indicator does not include: (1) deaths related to chronic use of drugs (e.g., damage to organs from long-term drug use), 2) deaths due to alcohol and tobacco, and 3) deaths that occur under the influence of drugs, but do not involve acute poisoning (e.g., a car crash that occurred because the driver was drowsy from taking a prescription drug).
  • Drug Overdose Deaths Involving Opioids – drug overdose deaths caused by acute poisonings that involve any opioid as a contributing cause of death, regardless of intent (e.g., unintentional, suicide, assault, or undetermined). Opioids include both prescription opioid pain relievers such as hydrocodone, oxycodone, and morphine, as well as heroin and opium. Deaths related to chronic use of drugs (e.g., damage to organs from long-term drug use), are excluded from this indicator.
  • Drug Overdose Deaths Involving Prescription Opioids: Natural, Semisynthetic and Synthetic Opioids – drug overdose deaths caused by acute poisonings that involve prescription opioid pain relievers as a contributing cause of death, regardless of intent (e.g., unintentional, suicide, assault, or undetermined). Prescribed opioid pain relievers include such drugs as hydrocodone, oxycodone, morphine, and fentanyl. Deaths related to chronic use of drugs (e.g., damage to organs from long-term drug use), are excluded from this indicator.
  • Drug Overdose Deaths Involving Prescription Opioids: Natural and Semi-synthetic Opioids and Methadone – drug overdose deaths caused by acute poisonings that involve certain subcategories of prescription opioid pain relievers as a contributing cause of death, regardless of intent (e.g., unintentional, suicide, assault, or undetermined).Prescribed opioid pain relievers include such drugs as hydrocodone, oxycodone, and morphine. Deaths related to chronic use of drugs (e.g., damage to organs from long-term drug use), are excluded from this indicator.
  • Drug Overdose Deaths Involving Natural and Semi-synthetic Opioids – drug overdose deaths caused by acute poisonings that involve natural and semisynthetic opioids as a contributing cause of death, regardless of intent (e.g., unintentional, suicide, assault, or undetermined). Natural and semisynthetic opioids include drugs such as morphine, codeine, hydrocodone, and oxycodone. Deaths related to chronic use of drugs (e.g., damage to organs from long-term drug use), are excluded from this indicator.
  • Drug Overdose Deaths Involving Methadone – drug overdose deaths caused by acute poisonings that involve methadone as a contributing cause of death, regardless of intent (e.g., unintentional, suicide, assault, or undetermined). Methadone is a synthetic opioid used both as a pain reliever and in medicated assisted therapy for drug dependence. Deaths related to chronic use of drugs (e.g., damage to organs from long-term drug use), are excluded from this indicator.
  • Drug Overdose Deaths Involving Heroin – drug overdose deaths caused by acute poisonings that involve heroin as a contributing cause of death, regardless of intent (e.g., unintentional, suicide, assault, or undetermined). Deaths related to chronic use of drugs (e.g., damage to organs from long-term drug use), are excluded from this indicator.

Inpatient Stay – a hospitalization.

Morbidity – amount of disease in a population.

Morbidity Indicators

  • All drug overdose emergency department visits – all drug overdose emergency department visits caused by non-fatal acute poisonings due to the effects of drugs, regardless of intent (e.g., suicide, unintentional, or undetermined). Emergency department visits related to late effects, adverse effects, and chronic poisonings due to the effects of drugs (e.g., damage to organs from long-term drug use), are excluded from this indicator.
  • Emergency department visits involving all opioid overdose excluding heroin – emergency department visits caused by non-fatal acute poisonings due to the effects of all opioids drugs, excluding heroin, regardless of intent (e.g., suicide, unintentional, or undetermined). Emergency department visits related to late effects, adverse effects, and chronic poisonings due to the effects of drugs (e.g., damage to organs from long-term drug use), are excluded from this indicator.
  • Emergency department visits involving heroin overdose – emergency department visits caused by non-fatal acute poisonings due to the effects of heroin, regardless of intent (e.g., suicide, unintentional, or undetermined). Emergency department visits related to late effects, adverse effects, and chronic poisonings due to the effects of drugs (e.g., damage to organs from long-term drug use), are excluded from this indicator.
  • All drug overdose hospitalizations – all drug overdose hospitalizations caused by non-fatal acute poisonings due to the effects of drugs, regardless of intent (e.g., suicide, unintentional, or undetermined). Hospitalizations related to late effects, adverse effects, and chronic poisonings due to the effects of drugs (e.g., damage to organs from long-term drug use), are excluded from this indicator.
  • Hospitalizations involving all opioid overdose excluding heroin – hospitalizations caused by non-fatal acute poisonings due to the effects of all opioids drugs, excluding heroin, regardless of intent (e.g., suicide, unintentional, or undetermined). Hospitalizations related to late effects, adverse effects, and chronic poisonings due to the effects of drugs (e.g., damage to organs from long-term drug use), are excluded from this indicator.
  • Hospitalizations involving heroin overdose – hospitalizations caused by non-fatal acute poisonings due to the effects of heroin, regardless of intent (e.g., suicide, unintentional, or undetermined). Hospitalizations related to late effects, adverse effects, and chronic poisonings due to the effects of drugs (e.g., damage to organs from long-term drug use), are excluded from this indicator.

Morphine Milligram Equivalent (MME) – morphine milligram equivalents, is a way to calculate the total amount of opioids, accounting for differences in opioid drug type and strength.

Opioid – a class of drugs that include the illegal drug heroin as well as powerful pain relievers available legally by prescription.

Outpatient Stay – typically to an emergency department.

Nonfatal Drug Overdose – a drug overdose that does not cause death.

Rate – How many times something happens relative to the number of people in the population over a period of time.

 

ABOUT ADDICTION CAMPUSES:

Addiction Campuses provides the most comprehensive addiction treatment program in the country by going beyond the standard 30-day plan and treating persons struggling with addiction mentally and spiritually to break the cycle of repeated visits to treatment. Utilizing our addiction campus environment we have the depth of caring staff, industry experience and clinical proficiency to effectively treat the disease of addiction for life. Addiction Campuses’ admissions center is trained to assess and place the client into one of the Addiction Campuses treatment centers across the country within a one-hour time frame. This speed in service delivery and thorough commitment to the client long term allows the person struggling with addiction to get quickly on the road to recovery and create a life that’s worth living.

 

############

Let us walk you through the treatment process. We're here to help.
100% Free and Confidential. Call (888) 966-8973

You're Not Alone.
Addiction Campuses Can Help.

Get Confidential Help 24/7

(888) 966-8973

Get 24/7 Treatment Help

(888) 966-8973

For Immediate Treatment Help Call:
(888) 966-8973